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WORLD CUP HISTORY

The first attempt at any kind of world
championship was in 1912, when a three-way series was
arranged between the then current Test playing nations,
Australia, England and South Africa. Dogged by poor
weather, the experiment was dropped and not repeated until
1975, when, following the success of domestic one-day
competitions, the six Test-playing nations (England,
Australia, New Zealand, West Indies, India and Pakistan)
were joined by Sri Lanka and East Africa in the first
World Cup in England. A resounding success, the tournament
was repeated in 1979 and 1983 in England, before moving
abroad, maintaining a four-year cycle. The next tournament
takes place in Asia in 2011. A brief history of previous
tournaments follows.

1975 World Cup in England – West Indies beat
Australia

The 1975 World Cup in England

West Indies victory heralds a new era

World Cup No. 1
Teams 8
Minnows East Africa, Sri Lanka (not a Test nation until 1982)

Format Two qualifying groups of four, playing each other once in
60-over matches; top two in each group progressed to
semi-finals; 15 matches in all.

Innovations Not many, apart from the concept itself (there had
only been 18 ODIs worldwide before this). Most teams still
treated the matches as if they were truncated Tests – especially
India, who played for a draw in the first game, responding to
England’s 334 for 4 with 132 for 3. Sunil Gavaskar batted
through the 60 overs for 36 not out; a disgusted spectator
dumped his lunch at the opener’s feet.

Early running England romped their group games – the tightest
was an 80-run victory over New Zealand. Favourites West Indies
nearly came unstuck against Pakistan, but last pair Deryck
Murray and Andy Roberts put on 64 to win. They then hammered
Australia by seven wickets at The Oval, where Alvin
Kallicharran’s 78 included a memorable attack on Dennis Lillee.
Glenn Turner hit two tons for NZ, including 171 not out v East
Africa.

The semis Headingley served up a swinging, seaming paradise
for England – but it was girthy Gary Gilmour (6 for 14) who did
the damage as England tumbled for 93. Australia were reeling at
39 for 6 themselves before Gilmour joined Doug Walters and took
them home. West Indies eased past NZ at The Oval with 19.5 overs
to spare, thanks to another sparkling innings from Kalli (72).

The final It was midsummer’s day (June 21), and Lord’s needed
all the available daylight to cram the match in. It eventually
finished at 8.42pm. After Roy Fredericks trod on his wicket as
he hooked Lillee out of the ground, Clive Lloyd took up the
fight in memorable fashion, crunching 12 fours and two sixes in
his 102, and the eventual 291 for 8 looked too hot for
Australia. The early batsmen kept trying quick runs to Viv
Richards; he kept running them out. At 233 for 9 it seemed over,
but last pair Jeff Thomson and Lillee inched the Aussies to
within 18 of victory before the fifth-run-out ended the fun.

Last hurrah Only Lillee, Thomson and Marsh of this great
Australian side graced another World Cup. Elegant West Indian
Rohan Kanhai bowed out of international cricket with a studied
55 in the final – he helped the rampaging Lloyd put on 149.
Kanhai was a late squad replacement after Garry Sobers cried off
injured. For England, the Packer-bound Amiss, Knott, Greig and
Snow played their only World Cup, and skipper Mike Denness
lasted only one more Test.

First hurrah One-day cricket itself – the five-day game had a
fight on its hands after the first “festival of cricket” lit up
the imagination. Of the players, Javed Miandad, just 18, made
his international debut, and had Clive Lloyd caught behind at
Edgbaston. Uniquely, he was also to play in the next five World
Cups. Imran Khan took time off from captaining Oxford to play in
the first of his five. Six of the West Indians also played in
the next final (and Greenidge, Richards, Lloyd and Roberts in
the one after that as well).

Not to be forgotten At the height of that last-wicket excitement
in the final, Lillee slapped a Van Holder no-ball straight to
Fredericks at extra cover. The crowd missed the call and rushed
on, thinking the match was over. Fredericks tried another
run-out, only to see the ball disappear into the horde. “Keep
running,” shouted Lillee to his mate. When order was restored,
umpires Dickie Bird and Tom Spencer declared they could have two
runs. “Pig’s arse,” cried Thommo. “We’ve been running up and
down here all afternoon!” So they gave them three.

Prudential World Cup, 1975 / Results
Winner – West Indies
Matches
1st Match: England v India at Lord’s – Jun 7, 1975
England 334/4 (60/60 ov); India 132/3 (60/60 ov)
England won by 202 runs

2nd Match: East Africa v New Zealand at Birmingham – Jun 7, 1975
New Zealand 309/5 (60/60 ov); East Africa 128/8 (60/60 ov)
New Zealand won by 181 runs

3rd Match: Australia v Pakistan at Leeds – Jun 7, 1975
Australia 278/7 (60/60 ov); Pakistan 205 (53/60 ov)
Australia won by 73 runs

4th Match: Sri Lanka v West Indies at Manchester – Jun 7, 1975
Sri Lanka 86 (37.2/60 ov); West Indies 87/1 (20.4/60 ov)
West Indies won by 9 wickets (with 236 balls remaining)

5th Match: England v New Zealand at Nottingham – Jun 11, 1975
England 266/6 (60/60 ov); New Zealand 186 (60/60 ov)
England won by 80 runs

6th Match: East Africa v India at Leeds – Jun 11, 1975
East Africa 120 (55.3/60 ov); India 123/0 (29.5/60 ov)
India won by 10 wickets (with 181 balls remaining)

7th Match: Australia v Sri Lanka at The Oval – Jun 11, 1975
Australia 328/5 (60/60 ov); Sri Lanka 276/4 (60/60 ov)
Australia won by 52 runs

8th Match: Pakistan v West Indies at Birmingham – Jun 11, 1975
Pakistan 266/7 (60/60 ov); West Indies 267/9 (59.4/60 ov)
West Indies won by 1 wicket (with 2 balls remaining)

9th Match: England v East Africa at Birmingham – Jun 14, 1975
England 290/5 (60/60 ov); East Africa 94 (52.3/60 ov)
England won by 196 runs

10th Match: India v New Zealand at Manchester – Jun 14, 1975
India 230 (60/60 ov); New Zealand 233/6 (58.5/60 ov)
New Zealand won by 4 wickets (with 7 balls remaining)

11th Match: Australia v West Indies at The Oval – Jun 14, 1975
Australia 192 (53.4/60 ov); West Indies 195/3 (46/60 ov)
West Indies won by 7 wickets (with 84 balls remaining)

12th Match: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at Nottingham – Jun 14, 1975
Pakistan 330/6 (60/60 ov); Sri Lanka 138 (50.1/60 ov)
Pakistan won by 192 runs

1st SF: England v Australia at Leeds – Jun 18, 1975
England 93 (36.2/60 ov); Australia 94/6 (28.4/60 ov)
Australia won by 4 wickets (with 188 balls remaining)

2nd SF: New Zealand v West Indies at The Oval – Jun 18, 1975
New Zealand 158 (52.2/60 ov); West Indies 159/5 (40.1/60 ov)
West Indies won by 5 wickets (with 119 balls remaining)

Final: Australia v West Indies at Lord’s – Jun 21, 1975
West Indies 291/8 (60/60 ov); Australia 274 (58.4/60 ov)
West Indies won by 17 runs

 

1979 World Cup in England – West Indies beat
England


The
1979 World Cup in England

West Indies retain their title

World Cup No. 2
Teams 8
Minnows Canada, Sri Lanka (not a Test nation
until 1982)

Format As 1975

Innovations The minor teams emerged from a
qualifying competition – the inaugural ICC Trophy, won
by Sri Lanka. Australia handicapped themselves by
selecting a largely unknown team (remember Graham Porter
or Jeff Moss?) as their best players were still
contracted to Kerry Packer’s World Series Cricket. West
Indies and Pakistan, fearing ructions at home if they
fared badly, chose all their WSC players. By the
following winter, peace had broken out and all the
Packer men were back in the fold.

Early Running West Indies topped their group with
two wins and a no-result against Sri Lanka, who upset
India by 47 runs at Old Trafford. New Zealand, with a
strong hand of medium-pacers who could bat a bit,
qualified with comfortable wins over Sri Lanka and India
before running West Indies close (32 runs) at Trent
Bridge. England breezed past Australia and bowled out
Canada for 45, before pipping Pakistan, the other
qualifiers from that group, in a low-scoring match at
Headingley. The only century in the group games was
Gordon Greenidge’s 106* for West Indies v India at
Edgbaston.

The Semis Mike Brearley (53 in 115 balls) and
Graham Gooch (71 from 84) held England’s innings
together after early wickets against New Zealand at Old
Trafford. Chasing 221, John Wright (69 from 137) did a
similar job before he was run out. NZ had lots of
allrounders – but still fell nine runs short. West
Indies ran up 293 for 6 at The Oval, but were sweating
as Majid Khan (81) and Zaheer Abbas (93) shared a
sparkling stand of 166. But Pakistan subsided to 250;
the middle-order destroyer was Viv Richards, with 3 for
52. West Indies were in the final again.

The Final It took a lot to upstage a brilliant
Richards century, but Collis King managed it. In his
finest hour (77 minutes, actually, but no-one was
counting) King blasted 86 for 66 balls, clouting ten
fours and three sixes. Richards ended the innings by
walking across his stumps and flicking Hendrick into the
Mound Stand for six: 286 for 9. In reply England’s
openers put on 129 – but too slowly, using up more than
half the available overs. Brearley made 64 from 130
balls and Boycott 57 from 103. With Larkins at No. 7, it
was a strong batting side … but they had too much to
do, as Joel Garner (5 for 38) zeroed in on the base of
the stumps, and 183 for 2 turned into 194 all out.

Last hurrah Majid Khan’s 81 in the semi-final – made
under one of his father’s old straw hats – was his last
World Cup innings. It was farewell World Cup, too, for
Asif Iqbal, who captained Pakistan in the first two
competitions although he hadn’t then skippered them in
Tests. For England, Boycott and Brearley, Old and Taylor
weren’t there next time round. Apart from captain Kim
Hughes and a handy-looking leftie (AR Border) the only
Australian who resurfaced was fast man Rodney Hogg.
Canada weren’t seen again for 24 years, either.

First hurrah Croft and Garner joined Holding and Roberts
in the champions’ awesome attack. Greenidge and Haynes
posted 106 together in the first match – the first of
their 15 century stands in ODIs. Border (see above)
played in the first of his four World Cups, as did
Gooch, John Wright, and Kapil Dev.

Not to be forgotten England’s unlikely bowling secret
weapon was Geoff Boycott, bowling his little
medium-pacers round the wicket, with cap reversed. He
took 2 for 15 v Australia, and 2 for 14 at the death
against Pakistan, when he lured Sikander Bakht into a
brainless swipe while Imran Khan was winning the game at
the other end. This persuaded England to pick four
recognised bowlers for the later games. Boycott even
took a wicket in the semi-final, but the plan unravelled
in the final itself – the 12 overs England cobbled
together from part-timers Boycott, Gooch and Larkins
cost 86.

World Cup, 1979 / Results
Winner – West Indies
Matches

1st Match: India v West Indies at Birmingham – Jun 9,
1979
India 190 (53.1/60 ov); West Indies 194/1 (51.3/60 ov)
West Indies won by 9 wickets (with 51 balls remaining)

2nd Match: New Zealand v Sri Lanka at Nottingham – Jun
9, 1979
Sri Lanka 189 (56.5/60 ov); New Zealand 190/1 (47.4/60
ov)
New Zealand won by 9 wickets (with 74 balls remaining)

3rd Match: England v Australia at Lord’s – Jun 9, 1979
Australia 159/9 (60/60 ov); England 160/4 (47.1/60 ov)
England won by 6 wickets (with 77 balls remaining)

4th Match: Canada v Pakistan at Leeds – Jun 9, 1979
Canada 139/9 (60/60 ov); Pakistan 140/2 (40.1/60 ov)
Pakistan won by 8 wickets (with 119 balls remaining)

5th Match: Sri Lanka v West Indies at The Oval – Jun
13-15, 1979
Match abandoned without a ball bowled

6th Match: India v New Zealand at Leeds – Jun 13, 1979
India 182 (55.5/60 ov); New Zealand 183/2 (57/60 ov)
New Zealand won by 8 wickets (with 18 balls remaining)

7th Match: Australia v Pakistan at Nottingham – Jun
13-14, 1979
Pakistan 286/7 (60/60 ov); Australia 197 (57.1/60 ov)
Pakistan won by 89 runs

8th Match: England v Canada at Manchester – Jun 13-14,
1979
Canada 45 (40.3/60 ov); England 46/2 (13.5/60 ov)
England won by 8 wickets (with 277 balls remaining)

9th Match: India v Sri Lanka at Manchester – Jun 16-18,
1979
Sri Lanka 238/5 (60/60 ov); India 191 (54.1/60 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 47 runs

10th Match: New Zealand v West Indies at Nottingham –
Jun 16, 1979
West Indies 244/7 (60/60 ov); New Zealand 212/9 (60/60
ov)
West Indies won by 32 runs

11th Match: Australia v Canada at Birmingham – Jun 16,
1979
Canada 105 (33.2/60 ov); Australia 106/3 (26/60 ov)
Australia won by 7 wickets (with 204 balls remaining)

12th Match: England v Pakistan at Leeds – Jun 16, 1979
England 165/9 (60/60 ov); Pakistan 151 (56/60 ov)
England won by 14 runs

1st SF: England v New Zealand at Manchester – Jun 20,
1979
England 221/8 (60/60 ov); New Zealand 212/9 (60/60 ov)
England won by 9 runs

2nd SF: Pakistan v West Indies at The Oval – Jun 20,
1979
West Indies 293/6 (60/60 ov); Pakistan 250 (56.2/60 ov)
West Indies won by 43 runs

Final: England v West Indies at Lord’s – Jun 23, 1979
West Indies 286/9 (60/60 ov); England 194 (51/60 ov)
West Indies won by 92 runs

1983 World Cup in England – India beat West Indies


The
1983 World Cup in England

India stun the World

World Cup No. 3
Teams
8
Minnows
Zimbabwe

Format Two groups of four, as in 1979; this time,
though, each team played the others in its group twice,
not once, to determine the four semi-finalists. As a
ploy to reduce the chance of elimination by the
weather, it was a good one, even if June wasn’t wet and
only three of the 27 games went into a reserve day
anyway. For the first time, non-Test grounds were used.

Innovations Umpires were told to apply a
stricter interpretation of wides and bouncers. The
result? More than twice as many wides per match as in
1979 (9.59 to 4.64). A fielding circle (actually an
oval) was introduced, 30 yards away from the stumps.
Four fieldsmen needed to be inside it at all times.

Early Running England dominated Group A, beating
Pakistan and Sri Lanka twice each, and New Zealand
once. They were followed into the semis by Pakistan,
who squeezed through by scoring 0.08 more runs per over
than the Kiwis. In Group B, West Indies and India
disposed of a disappointing Australian side and
newcomers Zimbabwe. The performance of the round came
from Winston Davis of West Indies, who demolished the
Aussies at Headingley with a Cup-record 7 for 51.

The Semis India’s dark horses had been creeping
up on the rails all tournament, and now they cantered
unfussily past a below-par England. Yashpal Sharma and
Sandeep Patil made light of a pitch which had
undermined England’s batsmen, and hit crashing fifties
in a six-wicket win. West Indies strutted on, brushing
aside Pakistan by eight wickets with more than 11 overs
to go. They were helped by a display of Test-match
patience from Pakistan’s opener, Mohsin Khan, who
scratched his way to an apologetic 70 off 176 balls. A
lone boundary punctuated his 43 singles, and his
team-mates succumbed to attempts to up the tempo at the
other end.

The Final In advance it
looked like an anticlimax. It would surely be another
big day for West Indies cricket, and no more than a big
day out for the Indians. When India were strangled for
183, and Richards led West Indies to 50 for 1 in reply,
Caribbean celebrations began. But then Madan Lal and
Mohinder Amarnath – who finished their careers with a
combined total of 103 wickets from 108 Tests – wobbled
the ball around, and somehow took three wickets each to
dismiss a disbelieving West Indies for 140. Upsets
don’t come much bigger.

Last Hurrah It was an unhappy farewell for
Dennis Lillee, Jeff Thomson and Rodney Marsh. Finalists
in 1975, but also-rans in ’83, they retired from
international cricket a few months later. New Zealand’s
batting bedrock, Glenn Turner, played his last game for
his country, and Bob Willis’s creaking limbs didn’t
hold out much longer. It was Clive Lloyd’s final World
Cup too – there may never be a better chance to win
three tournaments in a row.

First Hurrah NZ’s Martin Crowe, aged 20,
announced himself on the World Cup scene with 97 in the
tournament opener against England. There was a limited-overs
debut for Abdul Qadir, in which he bamboozled NZ to the
tune of 4 for 21, only to improve with 5 for 44 against
Sri Lanka. For once he received a pasting from England
(0 for 104 in two games).

Not to be forgotten In their first-ever Cup game
Zimbabwe beat Australia by 13 runs, but even this
looked commonplace after some chaos in Kent. Coming in
to bat for India against Zimbabwe at a disastrous 17
for 5, Kapil Dev turned the tranquillity of Tunbridge
Wells on its head by blasting an undefeated 175 out of
266 for 8, with 16 fours and six sixes. He put on a
Cup-record 126 for the ninth wicket with Syed Kirmani,
whose 24 not out was India’s next-best score. Oh, and
India won by 31 runs. Finally there was the mauling
Martin Snedden took in New Zealand’s opening match
against England. With Allan Lamb in belligerent mood,
his figures were an x-rated 12-1-105-2.

World Cup, 1983 /
Results
Winner – India
Matches

1st Match: England v New Zealand at
The Oval – Jun 9, 1983
England 322/6 (60/60 ov); New Zealand 216 (59/60 ov)
England won by 106 runs

2nd Match: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at Swansea – Jun 9,
1983
Pakistan 338/5 (60/60 ov); Sri Lanka 288/9 (60/60 ov)
Pakistan won by 50 runs

3rd Match: Australia v Zimbabwe at Nottingham – Jun 9,
1983
Zimbabwe 239/6 (60/60 ov); Australia 226/7 (60/60 ov)
Zimbabwe won by 13 runs

4th Match: India v West Indies at Manchester – Jun
9-10, 1983
India 262/8 (60/60 ov); West Indies 228 (54.1/60 ov)
India won by 34 runs

5th Match: England v Sri Lanka at Taunton – Jun 11,
1983
England 333/9 (60/60 ov); Sri Lanka 286 (58/60 ov)
England won by 47 runs

6th Match: New Zealand v Pakistan at Birmingham – Jun
11-12, 1983
New Zealand 238/9 (60/60 ov); Pakistan 186 (55.2/60 ov)
New Zealand won by 52 runs

7th Match: Australia v West Indies at Leeds – Jun
11-12, 1983
West Indies 252/9 (60/60 ov); Australia 151 (30.3/60 ov)
West Indies won by 101 runs

8th Match: India v Zimbabwe at Leicester – Jun 11, 1983
Zimbabwe 155 (51.4/60 ov); India 157/5 (37.3/60 ov)
India won by 5 wickets (with 135 balls remaining)

9th Match: England v Pakistan at Lord’s – Jun 13, 1983
Pakistan 193/8 (60/60 ov); England 199/2 (50.4/60 ov)
England won by 8 wickets (with 56 balls remaining)

10th Match: New Zealand v Sri Lanka at Bristol – Jun
13, 1983
Sri Lanka 206 (56.1/60 ov); New Zealand 209/5 (39.2/60
ov)
New Zealand won by 5 wickets (with 124 balls remaining)

11th Match: Australia v India at Nottingham – Jun 13,
1983
Australia 320/9 (60/60 ov); India 158 (37.5/60 ov)
Australia won by 162 runs

12th Match: West Indies v Zimbabwe at Worcester – Jun
13, 1983
Zimbabwe 217/7 (60/60 ov); West Indies 218/2 (48.3/60
ov)
West Indies won by 8 wickets (with 69 balls remaining)

13th Match: England v New Zealand at Birmingham – Jun
15, 1983
England 234 (55.2/60 ov); New Zealand 238/8 (59.5/60 ov)
New Zealand won by 2 wickets (with 1 ball remaining)

14th Match: India v West Indies at The Oval – Jun 15,
1983
West Indies 282/9 (60/60 ov); India 216 (53.1/60 ov)
West Indies won by 66 runs

15th Match: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at Leeds – Jun 16,
1983
Pakistan 235/7 (60/60 ov); Sri Lanka 224 (58.3/60 ov)
Pakistan won by 11 runs

16th Match: Australia v Zimbabwe at Southampton – Jun
16, 1983
Australia 272/7 (60/60 ov); Zimbabwe 240 (59.5/60 ov)
Australia won by 32 runs

17th Match: England v Pakistan at Manchester – Jun 18,
1983
Pakistan 232/8 (60/60 ov); England 233/3 (57.2/60 ov)
England won by 7 wickets (with 16 balls remaining)

18th Match: New Zealand v Sri Lanka at Derby – Jun 18,
1983
New Zealand 181 (58.2/60 ov); Sri Lanka 184/7 (52.5/60
ov)
Sri Lanka won by 3 wickets (with 43 balls remaining)

19th Match: Australia v West Indies at Lord’s – Jun 18,
1983
Australia 273/6 (60/60 ov); West Indies 276/3 (57.5/60
ov)
West Indies won by 7 wickets (with 13 balls remaining)

20th Match: India v Zimbabwe at Tunbridge Wells – Jun
18, 1983
India 266/8 (60/60 ov); Zimbabwe 235 (57/60 ov)
India won by 31 runs

21st Match: England v Sri Lanka at Leeds – Jun 20, 1983
Sri Lanka 136 (50.4/60 ov); England 137/1 (24.1/60 ov)
England won by 9 wickets (with 215 balls remaining)

22nd Match: New Zealand v Pakistan at Nottingham – Jun
20, 1983
Pakistan 261/3 (60/60 ov); New Zealand 250 (59.1/60 ov)
Pakistan won by 11 runs

23rd Match: Australia v India at Chelmsford – Jun 20,
1983
India 247 (55.5/60 ov); Australia 129 (38.2/60 ov)
India won by 118 runs

24th Match: West Indies v Zimbabwe at Birmingham – Jun
20, 1983
Zimbabwe 171 (60/60 ov); West Indies 172/0 (45.1/60 ov)
West Indies won by 10 wickets (with 89 balls remaining)

1st SF: England v India at Manchester – Jun 22, 1983
England 213 (60/60 ov); India 217/4 (54.4/60 ov)
India won by 6 wickets (with 32 balls remaining)

2nd SF: Pakistan v West Indies at The Oval – Jun 22,
1983
Pakistan 184/8 (60/60 ov); West Indies 188/2 (48.4/60
ov)
West Indies won by 8 wickets (with 68 balls remaining)

Final: India v West Indies at Lord’s – Jun 25, 1983
India 183 (54.4/60 ov); West Indies 140 (52/60 ov)
India won by 43 runs

1987 World Cup in India and Pakistan – Australia
beat England


The
1987 World Cup in India and Pakistan

Australia win tight tournament

World Cup No. 4
Teams
8
Minnows
Zimbabwe

Format As in 1983 but, due to
the shorter daylight hours on the subcontinent, games
were 50 overs per innings, not 60. There was an attempt
to cheer up disappointed crowds by staging a
third-place play-off between Pakistan and India, but
the star players demanded too much cash.

Innovations The first World Cup to be held away
from England was also the first to feature neutral
umpires.

Early Running
India beat Australia to the top of
Group A on superior run-rate, despite losing to them by
one run in the closest match of the tournament.
Zimbabwe didn’t disgrace themselves, but still lost
every match and gave New Zealand (without the
unavailable Hadlee) their only victory. In Group B
Pakistan cruised through, but England (without the
uninterested Gower and Botham) only qualified after a
bit of a scramble. West Indies failed to reach the
semi-finals for the first time, despite their 191-run
annihilation of Sri Lanka.

The Semis The hometown script started to go wrong.
On a dodgy Bombay pitch, Gooch spent most of his time
down on one knee as he and Gatting swept up 117 in 19
overs. The resulting 254 was too much even for India’s
talented batting line-up. Meanwhile Border’s boys,
fired up by Zaheer Abbas calling them a bunch of club
cricketers, outplayed glamorous Pakistan at Lahore.
Despite a searching spell from Imran (3 for 36),
Australia eventually reached 267 as Steve Waugh hit 18
from the final over. In reply Pakistan were in the mire
at 38 for 3. Imran and Miandad hinted at revival but,
after their departure, Pakistan just didn’t have the
firepower. Australia did, amd McDermott finished with 5
for 54, the best figures of the tournament.

The Final We didn’t know it
at the time, but this was the start of Australia’s
march to world domination. They won the toss and, as
most teams had done throughout the tournament, chose to
bat first. In the days before pinch-hitters, Marsh and
Boon’s 52 in the first ten overs constituted a flyer,
and the runs kept flowing as Boon top-scored with 75.
But with Gatting in command, their 253 seemed very
gettable, until the captain felt the need to
reverse-sweep Border’s first ball; it took the top
edge, bounced off his shoulder, and was snapped up by
Greg Dyer behind the stumps. England were struggling
from then, and though Lamb shepherded the tail well and
DeFreitas biffed the ball around, 17 from Craig
McDermott’s final over was practically impossible.

Last Hurrah Gavaskar, having hit his first and
only ODI ton against NZ, and averaged 50 in the
tournament, made his last international appearance.
Fittingly, it was at Bombay, his home ground. Imran
announced the first of his many retirements – but went
on to win in 1992. Viv Richards, playing in his fourth
World Cup, bid an apt adieu with a tournament-record
181 against Sri Lanka.

First Hurrah Sidhu and Moody made their ODI
debuts in the same match: Sidhu finished the tournament
averaging 55, Moody just 5. Phil Simmons made a couple
of fifties and a sparkling 89 against Sri Lanka. Tim
May and Andrew Jones rather dribbled onto the
international scene.

Not to be forgotten Courtney Walsh, normally the
most reliable of death bowlers, had a terrible time.
Allan Lamb and Co. took 30 off his last two overs as
England scraped a two-wicket win, then Pakistan’s
last-wicket pair needed 14 from one over to sneak home.
Qadir hit a straight six, before Walsh sportingly opted
to warn Salim Jaffer for backing up too far, rather
than just run him out. When West Indies lost, he
received a carpet from a grateful Karachi firm, and a
carpeting from the media.

World Cup, 1987/88 /
Results
Winner – Australia
Matches

1st Match: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at
Hyderabad (Sind) – Oct 8, 1987
Pakistan 267/6 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 252 (49.2 ov)
Pakistan won by 15 runs

2nd Match: England v West Indies at Gujranwala – Oct 9,
1987
West Indies 243/7 (50 ov); England 246/8 (49.3 ov)
England won by 2 wickets (with 3 balls remaining)

3rd Match: India v Australia at Chennai – Oct 9, 1987
Australia 270/6 (50 ov); India 269 (49.5 ov)
Australia won by 1 run

4th Match: New Zealand v Zimbabwe at Hyderabad (Deccan)
– Oct 10, 1987
New Zealand 242/7 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 239 (49.4 ov)
New Zealand won by 3 runs

5th Match: Pakistan v England at Rawalpindi – Oct
12-13, 1987
Pakistan 239/7 (50 ov); England 221 (48.4 ov)
Pakistan won by 18 runs

6th Match: Australia v Zimbabwe at Chennai – Oct 13,
1987
Australia 235/9 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 139 (42.4 ov)
Australia won by 96 runs

7th Match: Sri Lanka v West Indies at Karachi – Oct 13,
1987
West Indies 360/4 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 169/4 (50 ov)
West Indies won by 191 runs

8th Match: India v New Zealand at Bangalore – Oct 14,
1987
India 252/7 (50 ov); New Zealand 236/8 (50 ov)
India won by 16 runs

9th Match: Pakistan v West Indies at Lahore – Oct 16,
1987
West Indies 216 (49.3 ov); Pakistan 217/9 (50 ov)
Pakistan won by 1 wicket (with 0 balls remaining)

10th Match: England v Sri Lanka at Peshawar – Oct 17,
1987
England 296/4 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 158/8 (45/45 ov)
England won by 108 runs (revised target)

11th Match: India v Zimbabwe at Mumbai – Oct 17, 1987
Zimbabwe 135 (44.2 ov); India 136/2 (27.5 ov)
India won by 8 wickets (with 133 balls remaining)

12th Match: Australia v New Zealand at Indore – Oct
18-19, 1987
Australia 199/4 (30/30 ov); New Zealand 196/9 (30/30 ov)
Australia won by 3 runs

13th Match: Pakistan v England at Karachi – Oct 20,
1987
England 244/9 (50 ov); Pakistan 247/3 (49 ov)
Pakistan won by 7 wickets (with 6 balls remaining)

14th Match: Sri Lanka v West Indies at Kanpur – Oct 21,
1987
West Indies 236/8 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 211/8 (50 ov)
West Indies won by 25 runs

15th Match: India v Australia at Delhi – Oct 22, 1987
India 289/6 (50 ov); Australia 233 (49 ov)
India won by 56 runs

16th Match: New Zealand v Zimbabwe at Kolkata – Oct 23,
1987
Zimbabwe 227/5 (50 ov); New Zealand 228/6 (47.4 ov)
New Zealand won by 4 wickets (with 14 balls remaining)

17th Match: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at Faisalabad – Oct
25, 1987
Pakistan 297/7 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 184/8 (50 ov)
Pakistan won by 113 runs

18th Match: England v West Indies at Jaipur – Oct 26,
1987
England 269/5 (50 ov); West Indies 235 (48.1 ov)
England won by 34 runs

19th Match: India v Zimbabwe at Ahmedabad – Oct 26,
1987
Zimbabwe 191/7 (50 ov); India 194/3 (42 ov)
India won by 7 wickets (with 48 balls remaining)

20th Match: Australia v New Zealand at Chandigarh – Oct
27, 1987
Australia 251/8 (50 ov); New Zealand 234 (48.4 ov)
Australia won by 17 runs

21st Match: Australia v Zimbabwe at Cuttack – Oct 30,
1987
Australia 266/5 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 196/6 (50 ov)
Australia won by 70 runs

22nd Match: England v Sri Lanka at Pune – Oct 30, 1987
Sri Lanka 218/7 (50 ov); England 219/2 (41.2 ov)
England won by 8 wickets (with 52 balls remaining)

23rd Match: Pakistan v West Indies at Karachi – Oct 30,
1987
West Indies 258/7 (50 ov); Pakistan 230/9 (50 ov)
West Indies won by 28 runs

24th Match: India v New Zealand at Nagpur – Oct 31,
1987
New Zealand 221/9 (50 ov); India 224/1 (32.1 ov)
India won by 9 wickets (with 107 balls remaining)

1st SF: Pakistan v Australia at Lahore – Nov 4, 1987
Australia 267/8 (50 ov); Pakistan 249 (49 ov)
Australia won by 18 runs

2nd SF: India v England at Mumbai – Nov 5, 1987
England 254/6 (50 ov); India 219 (45.3 ov)
England won by 35 runs

Final: Australia v England at Kolkata – Nov 8, 1987
Australia 253/5 (50 ov); England 246/8 (50 ov)
Australia won by 7 runs

1992 World Cup in Australia and New Zealand –
Pakistan beat England


The
1992 World Cup in Australia and New Zealand

Imran’s Tigers turn the corner

World Cup No. 5
Teams 9
Minnows Only Zimbabwe

Format This was the Cup that thought it was a
league. All played all in a qualifying round that went
on for ever. It was fair, but about as exciting as the
Nullarbor Plain. The good news was that South Africa
joined in for the first time, following the end of
apartheid.

Innovations Four big ones … 1) Coloured
clothing, with names on the back. 2) Floodlights for
most of the 36 games. 3) The white ball: in fact two of
them, one at each end (so they didn’t get too grubby),
which meant they swung prodigiously. 4) The fielding
circle rules were refined, allowing only two men outside
the ring in the first 15 overs. After that, it was as
before: a minimum of four inside the circle. Result: the
birth of the pinch-hitter. Ian Botham did the job for
England, with mixed results.

Early Running Australia, the holders and hosts,
were such hot favourites that the pressure got to them.
They lost the opening game, in New Zealand (Martin Crowe
100*), and then faced England at Sydney. Botham sniffed
the chance to trample the Aussies into the dirt for one
last time, took 4 for 31 and then made 53 not out as
England won by eight wickets. Pakistan started
dreadfully, losing to West Indies by 10 wickets, and
would have gone out if rain had not saved them at
Adelaide after England bowled them out for 74. England
and New Zealand were the best teams for a long time, but
both had peaked too soon. Imran Khan famously told his
team: “Listen, just be as if you were a cornered tiger,”
and they moved into top gear.

The Semis What’s the Afrikaans
for “We wuz robbed”? South Africa, playing England,
needed 22 off 13 balls when it rained. By the time it
stopped, they needed 21 off one ball. However, Kepler
Wessels had chosen to bat second, and South Africa had
bowled terribly slowly. NZ’s brave run came to an end as
Pakistan successfully chased 262, with the unknown
Inzamam-ul-Haq thumping 60 off 37 balls.

The Final Pakistan were on fire, and England were
not. Derek Pringle (3 for 22) removed the openers, but
Imran Khan and Javed Miandad (44 and 57* in the semi)
made 72 and 58 as Pakistan recovered to 249 for 6.
England were soon 69 for 4 (Botham 0), and when Neil
Fairbrother (62) and Allan Lamb (31) launched a
recovery, Wasim Akram snuffed it out, bowling Lamb and
Chris Lewis with consecutive beauties. Pakistan won by
22 runs.

Last Hurrah A whole herd of giants headed into
the sunset. Imran never played again, Botham managed one
last injury-ravaged summer, and it was also the last
World Cup for Gooch, Border, Lamb, Des Haynes …

First Hurrah Haynes’s opening partner was a young
thruster named Lara. Mushtaq Ahmed shone for Pakistan,
and Jonty Rhodes became the first superstar fielder.

Not to be forgotten Crowe opened NZ’s bowling
with Dipak Patel’s offspin. When England met India at
Perth, Botham faced Sachin Tendulkar for the only time
in an international: a fascinating little duel ended
with Tendulkar caught behind for 35.

World Cup, 1991/92 / Results
Winner – Pakistan
Matches

1st Match: New Zealand v Australia at
Auckland – Feb 22, 1992
New Zealand 248/6 (50 ov); Australia 211 (48.1 ov)
New Zealand won by 37 runs

2nd Match: England v India at Perth – Feb 22, 1992
England 236/9 (50 ov); India 227 (49.2 ov)
England won by 9 runs

3rd Match: Sri Lanka v Zimbabwe at New Plymouth – Feb
23, 1992
Zimbabwe 312/4 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 313/7 (49.2 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 3 wickets (with 4 balls remaining)

4th Match: Pakistan v West Indies at
Melbourne – Feb 23, 1992
Pakistan 220/2 (50 ov); West Indies 221/0 (46.5 ov)
West Indies won by 10 wickets (with 19 balls remaining)

5th Match: New Zealand v Sri Lanka at Hamilton – Feb 25,
1992
Sri Lanka 206/9 (50 ov); New Zealand 210/4 (48.2 ov)
New Zealand won by 6 wickets (with 10 balls remaining)

6th Match: Australia v South Africa at Sydney – Feb 26,
1992
Australia 170/9 (49/49 ov); South Africa 171/1 (46.5/49
ov)
South Africa won by 9 wickets (with 13 balls remaining)

7th Match: Pakistan v Zimbabwe at Hobart – Feb 27, 1992
Pakistan 254/4 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 201/7 (50 ov)
Pakistan won by 53 runs

8th Match: England v West Indies at Melbourne – Feb 27,
1992
West Indies 157 (49.2 ov); England 160/4 (39.5 ov)
England won by 6 wickets (with 61 balls remaining)

9th Match: India v Sri Lanka at Mackay – Feb 28, 1992
India 1/0 (0.2/20 ov)
No result

10th Match: New Zealand v South Africa at Auckland – Feb
29, 1992
South Africa 190/7 (50 ov); New Zealand 191/3 (34.3 ov)
New Zealand won by 7 wickets (with 93 balls remaining)

11th Match: West Indies v Zimbabwe at Brisbane – Feb 29,
1992
West Indies 264/8 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 189/7 (50 ov)
West Indies won by 75 runs

12th Match: Australia v India at Brisbane – Mar 1, 1992
Australia 237/9 (50 ov); India 234 (47/47 ov)
Australia won by 1 run (revised target)

13th Match: England v Pakistan at Adelaide – Mar 1, 1992
Pakistan 74 (40.2 ov); England 24/1 (8/16 ov)
No result

14th Match: South Africa v Sri Lanka at Wellington – Mar
2, 1992
South Africa 195 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 198/7 (49.5 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 3 wickets (with 1 ball remaining)

15th Match: New Zealand v Zimbabwe at Napier – Mar 3,
1992
New Zealand 162/3 (20.5/20.5 ov); Zimbabwe 105/7 (18/18
ov)
New Zealand won by 48 runs (revised target)

16th Match: India v Pakistan at Sydney – Mar 4, 1992
India 216/7 (49/49 ov); Pakistan 173 (48.1/49 ov)
India won by 43 runs

17th Match: South Africa v West Indies at Christchurch –
Mar 5, 1992
South Africa 200/8 (50 ov); West Indies 136 (38.4 ov)
South Africa won by 64 runs

18th Match: Australia v England at Sydney – Mar 5, 1992
Australia 171 (49 ov); England 173/2 (40.5 ov)
England won by 8 wickets (with 55 balls remaining)

19th Match: India v Zimbabwe at Hamilton – Mar 7, 1992
India 203/7 (32/32 ov); Zimbabwe 104/1 (19.1/19 ov)
India won by 55 runs (revised target)

20th Match: Australia v Sri Lanka at Adelaide – Mar 7,
1992
Sri Lanka 189/9 (50 ov); Australia 190/3 (44 ov)
Australia won by 7 wickets (with 36 balls remaining)

21st Match: New Zealand v West Indies at Auckland – Mar
8, 1992
West Indies 203/7 (50 ov); New Zealand 206/5 (48.3 ov)
New Zealand won by 5 wickets (with 9 balls remaining)

22nd Match: Pakistan v South Africa at Brisbane – Mar 8,
1992
South Africa 211/7 (50 ov); Pakistan 173/8 (36/36 ov)
South Africa won by 20 runs (revised target)

23rd Match: England v Sri Lanka at Ballarat – Mar 9,
1992
England 280/6 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 174 (44 ov)
England won by 106 runs

24th Match: India v West Indies at Wellington – Mar 10,
1992
India 197 (49.4 ov); West Indies 195/5 (40.2/46 ov)
West Indies won by 5 wickets (with 34 balls remaining)
(revised target)

25th Match: South Africa v Zimbabwe at Canberra – Mar
10, 1992
Zimbabwe 163 (48.3 ov); South Africa 164/3 (45.1 ov)
South Africa won by 7 wickets (with 29 balls remaining)

26th Match: Australia v Pakistan at Perth – Mar 11, 1992
Pakistan 220/9 (50 ov); Australia 172 (45.2 ov)
Pakistan won by 48 runs

27th Match: New Zealand v India at Dunedin – Mar 12,
1992
India 230/6 (50 ov); New Zealand 231/6 (47.1 ov)
New Zealand won by 4 wickets (with 17 balls remaining)

28th Match: England v South Africa at Melbourne – Mar
12, 1992
South Africa 236/4 (50 ov); England 226/7 (40.5/41 ov)
England won by 3 wickets (with 1 ball remaining)
(revised target)

29th Match: Sri Lanka v West Indies at Berri – Mar 13,
1992
West Indies 268/8 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 177/9 (50 ov)
West Indies won by 91 runs

30th Match: Australia v Zimbabwe at Hobart – Mar 14,
1992
Australia 265/6 (46/46 ov); Zimbabwe 137 (41.4/46 ov)
Australia won by 128 runs

31st Match: New Zealand v England at Wellington – Mar
15, 1992
England 200/8 (50 ov); New Zealand 201/3 (40.5 ov)
New Zealand won by 7 wickets (with 55 balls remaining)

32nd Match: India v South Africa at Adelaide – Mar 15,
1992
India 180/6 (30/30 ov); South Africa 181/4 (29.1/30 ov)
South Africa won by 6 wickets (with 5 balls remaining)

33rd Match: Pakistan v Sri Lanka at Perth – Mar 15, 1992
Sri Lanka 212/6 (50 ov); Pakistan 216/6 (49.1 ov)
Pakistan won by 4 wickets (with 5 balls remaining)

34th Match: New Zealand v Pakistan at Christchurch – Mar
18, 1992
New Zealand 166 (48.2 ov); Pakistan 167/3 (44.4 ov)
Pakistan won by 7 wickets (with 32 balls remaining)

35th Match: England v Zimbabwe at Albury – Mar 18, 1992
Zimbabwe 134 (46.1 ov); England 125 (49.1 ov)
Zimbabwe won by 9 runs

36th Match: Australia v West Indies at Melbourne – Mar
18, 1992
Australia 216/6 (50 ov); West Indies 159 (42.4 ov)
Australia won by 57 runs

1st SF: New Zealand v Pakistan at Auckland – Mar 21,
1992
New Zealand 262/7 (50 ov); Pakistan 264/6 (49 ov)
Pakistan won by 4 wickets (with 6 balls remaining)

2nd SF: England v South Africa at Sydney – Mar 22, 1992
England 252/6 (45/45 ov); South Africa 232/6 (43/43 ov)
England won by 19 runs (revised target)

Final: England v Pakistan at Melbourne – Mar 25, 1992
Pakistan 249/6 (50 ov); England 227 (49.2 ov)
Pakistan won by 22 runs

 

1996 World Cup in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka –
Sri Lanka beat Australia


The
1996 World Cup in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka’s crowning glory

World Cup No. 6
Teams 12
Minnows Holland, Kenya, United Arab Emirates

Format Two qualifying groups of six: each team
played the other five in its group to determine the
quarter-finalists. In other words, it took 30 matches
to eliminate Zimbabwe and the three minnows, then seven
more to reduce the remaining Test nations to one
winner.

Innovations 15-over fielding restrictions had
made their debut in 1992, but 1996 was the year the
pinch-hitters really seized their opportunity. Sri
Lanka, Australia and India exploited the wide open
spaces with aggressive early batting. England didn’t.
The third umpire also made his first appearance in
front of the TV monitor.

Early Running Sri Lanka finished top of Group A
despite beating only India of the fancied teams;
Australia and West Indies forfeited their matches in
Colombo rather than travel to a city where over 1000
people had been injured in a terrorist bomb only three
weeks earlier. But South Africa were the clear
favourites after five hyper-efficient victories in
Group B. Gary Kirsten’s 188 not out against UAE was a
Cup record. England, meanwhile, lost all three of their
games against Test nations, wobbled against Holland,
and lost their lunch against UAE (at least, Neil Smith
did).

The Quarters Jayasuriya savaged England, who
went down to their tenth successive defeat by a Test
nation, but skipper Atherton got off lighter than Wasim
Akram, who dropped out of Pakistan’s tie with India,
citing a side-strain. His Lahore house was stoned after
they lost by 39 runs. A spectacular 130 from NZ’s
unheralded Chris Harris left Australia in need of their
highest total batting second to win an ODI: Mark
Waugh’s record third hundred of the tournament (he had
already become the first man to make successive Cup
tons) made sure they got it. But the surprise packages
were West Indies, as Lara’s 111 inspired them to a
19-run win over South Africa.

The Semis A Calcutta crowd of 110,000 boiled
over as India slid to 120 for 8 in pursuit of Sri
Lanka’s 252. Fires were started in the stands, leading
to a win “by default” for SL. India’s decline had come
as a surprise after Srinath removed ballistic openers
Jayasuriya and Kaluwitharana in the first over, but de
Silva’s 66 led a recovery. That was nothing, however,
when compared with Australia’s comeback: they were 15
for 4 before Law and Bevan dragged them up to 207 for
8, then West Indies cruised to 165 for 2 in the 42nd
over. But four wickets from Warne and some tactical
wizardry from Mark Taylor precipitated an incredible
collapse: West Indies lost 8 for 37 in 50 balls, and
Richardson was stranded on 49 not out.

The Final No-one had
dominated a World Cup final to the extent that de Silva
did here. He took two catches and three wickets,
including Australia’s top-scorers Taylor and Ponting,
then strolled to an elegant 107 not out. Handicapped by
a slippery, dew-covered ball, Australia dropped several
chances, but never looked like defending 241.

Last Hurrah Javed Miandad, the only man to play
in every World Cup to date, finally bowed out. He
batted three times, making 11*, 5, and 38 in the
quarter-final. And Robin Smith’s selectorial misfortune
continued: he helped provide England’s brightest
moment, a record 147-run opening stand against
Pakistan, and was dumped for good immediately after the
tournament. It was also World Cup curtains for Richie
Richardson, Roger Harper, Asanka Gurusinha, Ramiz Raja,
Manoj Prabhakar, Phil DeFreitas, Dipak Patel, Andy
Waller and Craig McDermott (three Cups each). McDermott
bowled only three overs before returning home with a
calf strain.

First Hurrah Waqar Younis, surprisingly, was
appearing in his first World Cup (back injury in 1992).
Atherton and Gough made their debuts in the deflating
defeat by New Zealand, for whom only four players had
prior Cup experience. Shivnarine Chanderpaul, Ricky
Ponting and Glenn McGrath added to growing reputations
while Romesh Kaluwitharana is remembered as half of an
all-conquering opening partnership, even though he made
only 73 runs at 12.17.

Not to be forgotten Kenya beat West Indies in a
qualifying match at Pune on Leap Year Day: Steve Tikolo,
Kenya’s only professional, top-scored with 29 out of
166, then Maurice Odumbe and Rajab Ali took three
wickets apiece as West Indies crumbled for 93. The
prize wicket of Brian Lara fell to a catch by portly,
bespectacled keeper Tariq Iqbal; some thought it was
the only ball he had held onto all day.

World Cup, 1995/96 / Results

Winner – Sri Lanka
Matches

1st Match: England v New Zealand at
Ahmedabad – Feb 14, 1996
New Zealand 239/6 (50 ov); England 228/9 (50 ov)
New Zealand won by 11 runs

2nd Match: South Africa v United Arab Emirates at
Rawalpindi – Feb 16, 1996
South Africa 321/2 (50 ov); United Arab Emirates 152/8
(50 ov)
South Africa won by 169 runs

3rd Match: West Indies v Zimbabwe at Hyderabad (Deccan)
– Feb 16, 1996
Zimbabwe 151/9 (50 ov); West Indies 155/4 (29.3 ov)
West Indies won by 6 wickets (with 123 balls remaining)

5th Match: Sri Lanka v Australia at Colombo (RPS) – Feb
17, 1996
Sri Lanka won (walkover without a ball bowled)

4th Match: Netherlands v New Zealand at Vadodara – Feb
17, 1996
New Zealand 307/8 (50 ov); Netherlands 188/7 (50 ov)
New Zealand won by 119 runs

6th Match: India v Kenya at Cuttack – Feb 18, 1996
Kenya 199/6 (50 ov); India 203/3 (41.5 ov)
India won by 7 wickets (with 49 balls remaining)

7th Match: England v United Arab Emirates at Peshawar –
Feb 18, 1996
United Arab Emirates 136 (48.3 ov); England 140/2 (35
ov)
England won by 8 wickets (with 90 balls remaining)

8th Match: New Zealand v South Africa at Faisalabad –
Feb 20, 1996
New Zealand 177/9 (50 ov); South Africa 178/5 (37.3 ov)
South Africa won by 5 wickets (with 75 balls remaining)

9th Match: Sri Lanka v Zimbabwe at Colombo (SSC) – Feb
21, 1996
Zimbabwe 228/6 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 229/4 (37 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 6 wickets (with 78 balls remaining)

10th Match: India v West Indies at Gwalior – Feb 21,
1996
West Indies 173 (50 ov); India 174/5 (39.4 ov)
India won by 5 wickets (with 62 balls remaining)

11th Match: England v Netherlands at Peshawar – Feb 22,
1996
England 279/4 (50 ov); Netherlands 230/6 (50 ov)
England won by 49 runs

12th Match: Australia v Kenya at Visakhapatnam – Feb
23, 1996
Australia 304/7 (50 ov); Kenya 207/7 (50 ov)
Australia won by 97 runs

13th Match: Pakistan v United Arab Emirates at
Gujranwala – Feb 24, 1996
United Arab Emirates 109/9 (33/33 ov); Pakistan 112/1
(18/33 ov)
Pakistan won by 9 wickets (with 90 balls remaining)

15th Match: Sri Lanka v West Indies at Colombo (RPS) –
Feb 25, 1996
Sri Lanka won (walkover without a ball bowled)

14th Match: England v South Africa at Rawalpindi – Feb
25, 1996
South Africa 230 (50 ov); England 152 (44.3 ov)
South Africa won by 78 runs

16th Match: Kenya v Zimbabwe at Patna – Feb 26, 1996
Zimbabwe 45/3 (15.5 ov)
No result

17th Match: Pakistan v Netherlands at Lahore – Feb 26,
1996
Netherlands 145/7 (50 ov); Pakistan 151/2 (30.4 ov)
Pakistan won by 8 wickets (with 116 balls remaining)

16th Match: Kenya v Zimbabwe at Patna – Feb 27, 1996
Kenya 134 (49.4 ov); Zimbabwe 137/5 (42.2 ov)
Zimbabwe won by 5 wickets (with 46 balls remaining)

18th Match: New Zealand v United Arab Emirates at
Faisalabad – Feb 27, 1996
New Zealand 276/8 (47/47 ov); United Arab Emirates
167/9 (47/47 ov)
New Zealand won by 109 runs

19th Match: India v Australia at Mumbai – Feb 27, 1996
Australia 258 (50 ov); India 242 (48 ov)
Australia won by 16 runs

20th Match: Kenya v West Indies at Pune – Feb 29, 1996
Kenya 166 (49.3 ov); West Indies 93 (35.2 ov)
Kenya won by 73 runs

21st Match: Pakistan v South Africa at Karachi – Feb
29, 1996
Pakistan 242/6 (50 ov); South Africa 243/5 (44.2 ov)
South Africa won by 5 wickets (with 34 balls remaining)

22nd Match: Australia v Zimbabwe at Nagpur – Mar 1,
1996
Zimbabwe 154 (45.3 ov); Australia 158/2 (36 ov)
Australia won by 8 wickets (with 84 balls remaining)

23rd Match: Netherlands v United Arab Emirates at
Lahore – Mar 1, 1996
Netherlands 216/9 (50 ov); United Arab Emirates 220/3
(44.2 ov)
United Arab Emirates won by 7 wickets (with 34 balls
remaining)

24th Match: India v Sri Lanka at Delhi – Mar 2, 1996
India 271/3 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 272/4 (48.4 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 6 wickets (with 8 balls remaining)

25th Match: Pakistan v England at Karachi – Mar 3, 1996
England 249/9 (50 ov); Pakistan 250/3 (47.4 ov)
Pakistan won by 7 wickets (with 14 balls remaining)

26th Match: Australia v West Indies at Jaipur – Mar 4,
1996
Australia 229/6 (50 ov); West Indies 232/6 (48.5 ov)
West Indies won by 4 wickets (with 7 balls remaining)

27th Match: Netherlands v South Africa at Rawalpindi –
Mar 5, 1996
South Africa 328/3 (50 ov); Netherlands 168/8 (50 ov)
South Africa won by 160 runs

28th Match: Sri Lanka v Kenya at Kandy – Mar 6, 1996
Sri Lanka 398/5 (50 ov); Kenya 254/7 (50 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 144 runs

29th Match: India v Zimbabwe at Kanpur – Mar 6, 1996
India 247/5 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 207 (49.4 ov)
India won by 40 runs

30th Match: Pakistan v New Zealand at Lahore – Mar 6,
1996
Pakistan 281/5 (50 ov); New Zealand 235 (47.3 ov)
Pakistan won by 46 runs

1st QF: England v Sri Lanka at Faisalabad – Mar 9, 1996
England 235/8 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 236/5 (40.4 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 5 wickets (with 56 balls remaining)

2nd QF: India v Pakistan at Bangalore – Mar 9, 1996
India 287/8 (50 ov); Pakistan 248/9 (49/49 ov)
India won by 39 runs

3rd QF: South Africa v West Indies at Karachi – Mar 11,
1996
West Indies 264/8 (50 ov); South Africa 245 (49.3 ov)
West Indies won by 19 runs

4th QF: Australia v New Zealand at Chennai – Mar 11,
1996
New Zealand 286/9 (50 ov); Australia 289/4 (47.5 ov)
Australia won by 6 wickets (with 13 balls remaining)

1st SF: India v Sri Lanka at Kolkata – Mar 13, 1996
Sri Lanka 251/8 (50 ov); India 120/8 (34.1 ov)
Sri Lanka won by default

2nd SF: Australia v West Indies at Mohali – Mar 14,
1996
Australia 207/8 (50 ov); West Indies 202 (49.3 ov)
Australia won by 5 runs

Final: Australia v Sri Lanka at Lahore – Mar 17, 1996
Australia 241/7 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 245/3 (46.2 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 7 wickets (with 22 balls remaining)

 

1999 World Cup in England – Australia beat Pakistan


The
1999 World Cup in England

Australia win anti-climactic final

World Cup No. 7
Teams 12
Minnows Scotland , Kenya, Bangladesh

Format
Not so much tinkering as a complete revamp. The 12
entrants were split into two groups, and the top three
in each group went into the Super Six, carrying with
them the points they had earned against the two teams
who had also qualified from their group. They then
played the qualifying teams from the other group,
creating a final all-played-all league table, with the
top four going into the semi-finals. Confused? Most
people were.

Innovations
The Super Sixes were enough for everyone. The flaws
became glaringly obvious as washed-out matches skewed
the groups, and somehow Zimbabwe qualified at the top
of their group as their defeats in the first stage came
against sides who were eliminated. The organisers also
hit on the idea of putting on an opening ceremony so
dire as to make people long for the overblown hype of
three years earlier.

Early Running
Australia, the favourites, struggled, losing to
Pakistan and New Zealand, and thereafter needed to win
every game to avoid elimination. However, their match
against West Indies was a coordinated farce, with the
complex points system persuading Australia to aim for a
narrow win to ensure both of them went through at New
Zealand’s expense – at one stage, chasing a paltry 111,
Australia scored 12 runs in 10 overs. England, with
home advantage, were surprisingly eliminated, mainly
because Zimbabwe sprung two major upsets, defeating
India and South Africa, while Sri Lanka, the holders,
never remotely looked like staging anything resembling
a meaningful defence. Bangladesh’s defeat of Pakistan
in a dead rubber sparked justified celebrations … but
deep suspicion has since been cast over the result.

Super Sixes
The system of carrying forward points earned against
other qualifiers meant Zimbabwe headed the table before
a match had been played, although they were beaten in
all three games and eliminated. India, handicapped by
qualifying without a point, went out despite a
convincing victory over Pakistan, and Australia also
had to come from a standing start, only securing a
semi-final place against South Africa with a
five-wicket win in their final match against … South
Africa. Pakistan topped the group, despite only winning
one Super Six match (against Zimbabwe). New Zealand
also went through with a solitary win.

The Semis
At Old Trafford, Pakistan’s Saeed Anwar (113*) and
Wajahatullah Wasti (84) made light of overhauling New
Zealand’s 241 for 7 in a nine-wicket win, leaving those
non-Pakistanis who had paid £120 to touts for a ticket
a little short-changed. The other match at Edgbaston
was a classic, with South Africa seemingly assured of
victory in a see-saw contest when Lance Klusener,
needing nine to win off the final over, crashed Damien
Fleming’s first two deliveries for four. Klusener tried
a sharp single from the fourth ball, Allan Donald
failed to hear his call and was run-out by half the
length of the pitch. Even though the match was tied,
Australia reached the final as they had finished higher
in the Super Sixes.

The Final
“An unworthy match produced worthy winners,” noted
Wisden Cricket M onthly. The game was eagerly
anticipated, even though the Lord’s crowd was more
corporate than enthusiasts, but a contest that had
started at 11.15, half an hour late, was all over by
4.35 because Pakistan, the most exciting side in the
tournament, had gone to pieces when it mattered most.

Last Hurrah
The cast list of those bowing out was impressive, not
least a brace of Waughs from Australia , West Indies ‘
Courtney Walsh and Curtly Ambrose (who topped the list
of most economical bowlers), and Arjuna Ranatunga and
Aravinda de Silva from Sri Lanka’s victorious 1996
side. Three others were making a World Cup farewell,
not that we knew it at the time – Shane Warne missed
2003 after failing a drugs test and then retired from
one-day cricket, while Mohammad Azharuddin and Hansie
Cronje fell from grace after being embroiled in the
match-fixing scandal

First Hurrah
Rahul Dravid topped the run scorers in his first
tournament with 461; Klusener set the tournament alight
with his clubbing; Zimbabwe’s Neil Johnson showed his
allround class with 367 runs and 12 wickets.

Not to be forgotten
The spread-betting companies failed to allow for the
swinging white Dukes ball – one estimated 240 to 260
wides in advance and were taken to the cleaners when
there turned out to be 979; wildly enthusiastic support
for the Asian countries, not seen in any of the three
previous English World Cups; Some dodgy planning which
hoisted the ECB by its own petard – they got greedy and
ended up with sponsor slots unfilled … they also
managed to release the official tournament single the
day after England had been eliminated.

World Cup, 1999 / Results

Winner – Australia
Matches

1st Match: England v Sri Lanka at
Lord’s – May 14, 1999
Sri Lanka 204 (48.4 ov); England 207/2 (46.5 ov)
England won by 8 wickets (with 19 balls remaining)

2nd Match: India v South Africa at Hove – May 15, 1999
India 253/5 (50 ov); South Africa 254/6 (47.2 ov)
South Africa won by 4 wickets (with 16 balls remaining)

3rd Match: Kenya v Zimbabwe at Taunton – May 15, 1999
Kenya 229/7 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 231/5 (41 ov)
Zimbabwe won by 5 wickets (with 54 balls remaining)

4th Match: Australia v Scotland at Worcester – May 16,
1999
Scotland 181/7 (50 ov); Australia 182/4 (44.5 ov)
Australia won by 6 wickets (with 31 balls remaining)

5th Match: Pakistan v West Indies at
Bristol – May 16, 1999
Pakistan 229/8 (50 ov); West Indies 202 (48.5 ov)
Pakistan won by 27 runs

6th Match: Bangladesh v New Zealand at Chelmsford – May
17, 1999
Bangladesh 116 (37.4 ov); New Zealand 117/4 (33 ov)
New Zealand won by 6 wickets (with 102 balls remaining)

7th Match: England v Kenya at Canterbury – May 18, 1999
Kenya 203 (49.4 ov); England 204/1 (39 ov)
England won by 9 wickets (with 66 balls remaining)

8th Match: India v Zimbabwe at Leicester – May 19, 1999
Zimbabwe 252/9 (50 ov); India 249 (45/46 ov)
Zimbabwe won by 3 runs

9th Match: South Africa v Sri Lanka at Northampton –
May 19, 1999
South Africa 199/9 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 110 (35.2 ov)
South Africa won by 89 runs

10th Match: Australia v New Zealand at Cardiff – May
20, 1999
Australia 213/8 (50 ov); New Zealand 214/5 (45.2 ov)
New Zealand won by 5 wickets (with 28 balls remaining)

11th Match: Pakistan v Scotland at Chester-le-Street –
May 20, 1999
Pakistan 261/6 (50 ov); Scotland 167 (38.5/49 ov)
Pakistan won by 94 runs

12th Match: Bangladesh v West Indies at Dublin – May
21, 1999
Bangladesh 182 (49.2 ov); West Indies 183/3 (46.3 ov)
West Indies won by 7 wickets (with 21 balls remaining)

13th Match: England v South Africa at The Oval – May
22, 1999
South Africa 225/7 (50 ov); England 103 (41 ov)
South Africa won by 122 runs

14th Match: Sri Lanka v Zimbabwe at Worcester – May 22,
1999
Zimbabwe 197/9 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 198/6 (46 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 4 wickets (with 24 balls remaining)

15th Match: India v Kenya at Bristol – May 23, 1999
India 329/2 (50 ov); Kenya 235/7 (50 ov)
India won by 94 runs

16th Match: Australia v Pakistan at Leeds – May 23,
1999
Pakistan 275/8 (50 ov); Australia 265 (49.5 ov)
Pakistan won by 10 runs

17th Match: Scotland v Bangladesh at Edinburgh – May
24, 1999
Bangladesh 185/9 (50 ov); Scotland 163 (46.2/49 ov)
Bangladesh won by 22 runs

18th Match: New Zealand v West Indies at Southampton –
May 24, 1999
New Zealand 156 (48.1 ov); West Indies 158/3 (44.2 ov)
West Indies won by 7 wickets (with 34 balls remaining)

19th Match: England v Zimbabwe at
Nottingham – May 25, 1999
Zimbabwe 167/8 (50 ov); England 168/3 (38.3 ov)
England won by 7 wickets (with 69 balls remaining)

20th Match: Kenya v South Africa at Amstelveen – May
26, 1999
Kenya 152 (44.3 ov); South Africa 153/3 (41 ov)
South Africa won by 7 wickets (with 54 balls remaining)

21st Match: India v Sri Lanka at Taunton – May 26, 1999
India 373/6 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 216 (42.3 ov)
India won by 157 runs

22nd Match: Australia v Bangladesh at Chester-le-Street
– May 27, 1999
Bangladesh 178/7 (50 ov); Australia 181/3 (19.5 ov)
Australia won by 7 wickets (with 181 balls remaining)

23rd Match: Scotland v West Indies at Leicester – May
27, 1999
Scotland 68 (31.3 ov); West Indies 70/2 (10.1 ov)
West Indies won by 8 wickets (with 239 balls remaining)

24th Match: New Zealand v Pakistan at Derby – May 28,
1999
Pakistan 269/8 (50 ov); New Zealand 207/8 (50 ov)
Pakistan won by 62 runs

25th Match: England v India at Birmingham – May 29-30,
1999
India 232/8 (50 ov); England 169 (45.2 ov)
India won by 63 runs

26th Match: South Africa v Zimbabwe at Chelmsford – May
29, 1999
Zimbabwe 233/6 (50 ov); South Africa 185 (47.2 ov)
Zimbabwe won by 48 runs

27th Match: Kenya v Sri Lanka at Southampton – May 30,
1999
Sri Lanka 275/8 (50 ov); Kenya 230/6 (50 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 45 runs

28th Match: Australia v West Indies at Manchester – May
30, 1999
West Indies 110 (46.4 ov); Australia 111/4 (40.4 ov)
Australia won by 6 wickets (with 56 balls remaining)

29th Match: Bangladesh v Pakistan at Northampton – May
31, 1999
Bangladesh 223/9 (50 ov); Pakistan 161 (44.3/49 ov)
Bangladesh won by 62 runs

30th Match: Scotland v New Zealand at Edinburgh – May
31, 1999
Scotland 121 (42.1 ov); New Zealand 123/4 (17.5 ov)
New Zealand won by 6 wickets (with 193 balls remaining)

1st Super: Australia v India at The Oval – Jun 4, 1999
Australia 282/6 (50 ov); India 205 (48.2 ov)
Australia won by 77 runs

2nd Super: Pakistan v South Africa at Nottingham – Jun
5, 1999
Pakistan 220/7 (50 ov); South Africa 221/7 (49 ov)
South Africa won by 3 wickets (with 6 balls remaining)

3rd Super: New Zealand v Zimbabwe at Leeds – Jun 6-7,
1999
Zimbabwe 175 (49.3 ov); New Zealand 70/3 (15 ov)
No result

4th Super: India v Pakistan at Manchester – Jun 8, 1999
India 227/6 (50 ov); Pakistan 180 (45.3 ov)
India won by 47 runs

5th Super: Australia v Zimbabwe at Lord’s – Jun 9, 1999
Australia 303/4 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 259/6 (50 ov)
Australia won by 44 runs

6th Super: New Zealand v South Africa at Birmingham –
Jun 10, 1999
South Africa 287/5 (50 ov); New Zealand 213/8 (50 ov)
South Africa won by 74 runs

7th Super: Pakistan v Zimbabwe at The Oval – Jun 11,
1999
Pakistan 271/9 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 123 (40.3/49 ov)
Pakistan won by 148 runs

8th Super: India v New Zealand at Nottingham – Jun 12,
1999
India 251/6 (50 ov); New Zealand 253/5 (48.2 ov)
New Zealand won by 5 wickets (with 10 balls remaining)

9th Super: Australia v South Africa at Leeds – Jun 13,
1999
South Africa 271/7 (50 ov); Australia 272/5 (49.4 ov)
Australia won by 5 wickets (with 2 balls remaining)

1st SF: New Zealand v Pakistan at Manchester – Jun 16,
1999
New Zealand 241/7 (50 ov); Pakistan 242/1 (47.3 ov)
Pakistan won by 9 wickets (with 15 balls remaining)

2nd SF: Australia v South Africa at Birmingham – Jun
17, 1999
Australia 213 (49.2 ov); South Africa 213 (49.4 ov)
Match tied

Final: Australia v Pakistan at Lord’s – Jun 20, 1999
Pakistan 132 (39 ov); Australia 133/2 (20.1 ov)
Australia won by 8 wickets (with 179 balls remaining)
 

2003 World Cup in South Africa – Australia beat
India


The
2003 World Cup in South Africa

Superb Australia leave others trailing

World Cup No. 8
Teams 14
Minnows Canada, Holland, Namibia

Format
The organisers all but ignored the lessons learned from
1999 and persevered with the Super Six format, although
they tried to even things out by tweaking how points
earned in the group stage were carried through. It was
still to prove fundamentally flawed as boycotts of
matches in Kenya and Zimbabwe, on political and safety
grounds, skewed the points so much that Kenya reached
the semi-finals courtesy of wins over Bangladesh,
Canada and Sri Lanka.

Innovations
The bloated schedule resulting from an increase from 12
teams from 14 led to far too many meaningless one-sided
matches. “It was simply too big and too long,” Wisden
noted, and at over six weeks it was hard to disagree.
The extra matches also forced reserve days to be
scrapped even though the competition was being held
late in South Africa’s cricketing year, resulting in
two crucial washouts which effectively eliminated
Pakistan and West Indies. The experiment with using
Hawkeye, trialled in the Champions Trophy a few months
earlier, was not continued. Relay throwing made its
first appearance.

Early Running
The competition got off to a flier with a great game
between South Africa and West Indies. At the time, the
home side’s defeat looked a mere hiccup; a ridiculous
miscalculation in their final group game meant that it
contributed to their early exit, with a resulting
tailing off in local interest. Canada briefly enlivened
proceedings when they beat Bangladesh, although
Bangladesh’s subsequent performances underlined how
poor a side they were. Kenya went through to the Super
Sixes courtesy of the win they were handed when New
Zealand refused to play in Nairobi, but whatever the
circumstances, their success provided some welcome
highlights. Zimbabwe progressed thanks to England’s
boycott of Harare and the points they got in the
abandoned match against Pakistan, but their every move
was overshadowed by internal politics.

Super Six
Oh dear. Australia were all but guaranteed a semi-final
berth before they started, while Kenya and Sri Lanka
only had to beat a Zimbabwe side whose morale was in
freefall to do the same. India joined those three with
convincing wins in all their Super Six matches. But
while the presence of two minnows pleased the neutrals,
the absence of so many big names, including the host
nation, meant many games were played out against a
backdrop of empty stands.

The Semis
For all the pre-match hype, India were never going to
slip up against a keen but limited Kenyan side,
especially in front of a capacity crowd that
outnumbered the Africans by about 100 to one. Sourav
Ganguly hit a hundred and from then on the players did
little more than go through the motions. Australia
survived some uneasy moments to see off Sri Lanka ,
with Brett Lee restoring the world order after
Australia had limped to 212 for 7. Although rain ended
the game early, the result had long since been known.

The Final
In its way this was as one-sided as 1999, but this time
the crowd were treated to a feast of batting before a
second-half that was only ever going to go through the
motions. So savage was the attack led by Ricky Ponting
(140 not out off 121 balls) with support from Damien
Martyn and Adam Gilchrist that Australia ‘s 359 for 2
was never under threat. Ganguly went down with guns
blazing, although a rain break, preceded by Ponting
desperately asking his spinners to race through overs
to ensure a result, did briefly stir the crowd. The
Australians were deserved winners, and unlike 1999,
they dominated throughout. Michael Bevan collected his
second winner’s medal …easy work for a man who wasn’t
called upon to bat or bowl in either final.

Last Hurrah
A raft of Zimbabweans, most notably the black-armband
rebels, Andy Flower and Henry Olonga, who were driven
into cricketing exile; Waqar Younis, the fall guy for
Pakistan’s failure; Carl Hooper, another captain to be
chopped; Allan Donald, Jonty Rhodes and Gary Kirsten
all wanted to end on a home win but slid into
retirement in the rain at Durban; the two-time
champions bade farewell to Bevan and Lehmann, the
runners-up to Javagal Srinath. Sri Lanka’s Aravinda de
Silva called time after his team’s semi-final exit.

First Hurrah
More than ever, this tournament was dominated by the
old guard, and few new faces blasted their way onto the
World Cup scene. James Anderson showed promise, Andrew
Symonds underlined what we all knew, while Kenya’s
Collins Obuya hinted at what might have been.

Not to be forgotten
Flower and Olonga’s black armband protest (and the ICC
tut-tutting which followed); Jon Davison’s belligerent
111 against West Indies; Sachin Tendulkar’s brilliance
with the bat; England’s “will they, won’t they”
prevarication over playing in Zimbabwe and the ICC’s
utter inability to put players before money; ambush
marketing and the stand-off with the Indian team over
sponsorship which preceded the event; Percy Sonn, the
ICC president who was then head of the South African
board, using his nation’s time in the global spotlight
to fall over blind drunk in front of other senior
administrators.

ICC World Cup, 2002/03 / Results
Winner – Australia
Matches

1st Match: South Africa v West
Indies at Cape Town – Feb 9, 2003
West Indies 278/5 (50 ov); South Africa 275/9 (49/49 ov)
West Indies won by 3 runs

2nd Match: Zimbabwe v Namibia at Harare – Feb 10, 2003
Zimbabwe 340/2 (50 ov); Namibia 104/5 (25.1/25.1 ov)
Zimbabwe won by 86 runs (D/L method)

3rd Match: New Zealand v Sri Lanka at Bloemfontein –
Feb 10, 2003
Sri Lanka 272/7 (50 ov); New Zealand 225 (45.3 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 47 runs

4th Match: Australia v Pakistan at Johannesburg – Feb
11, 2003
Australia 310/8 (50 ov); Pakistan 228 (44.3/49 ov)
Australia won by 82 runs

5th Match: Bangladesh v Canada at Durban – Feb 11, 2003
Canada 180 (49.1 ov); Bangladesh 120 (28 ov)
Canada won by 60 runs

6th Match: South Africa v Kenya at Potchefstroom – Feb
12, 2003
Kenya 140 (38 ov); South Africa 142/0 (21.2 ov)
South Africa won by 10 wickets (with 172 balls
remaining)

7th Match: India v Netherlands at Paarl – Feb 12, 2003
India 204 (48.5 ov); Netherlands 136 (48.1 ov)
India won by 68 runs

8th Match: Zimbabwe v England at Harare – Feb 13, 2003
Zimbabwe won (walkover without a ball bowled)

9th Match: New Zealand v West Indies at Port Elizabeth
– Feb 13, 2003
New Zealand 241/7 (50 ov); West Indies 221 (49.4 ov)
New Zealand won by 20 runs

10th Match: Bangladesh v Sri Lanka at Pietermaritzburg
– Feb 14, 2003
Bangladesh 124 (31.1 ov); Sri Lanka 126/0 (21.1 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 10 wickets (with 173 balls remaining)

11th Match: Australia v India at Centurion – Feb 15,
2003
India 125 (41.4 ov); Australia 128/1 (22.2 ov)
Australia won by 9 wickets (with 166 balls remaining)

12th Match: Canada v Kenya at Cape Town – Feb 15, 2003
Canada 197 (49 ov); Kenya 198/6 (48.3 ov)
Kenya won by 4 wickets (with 9 balls remaining)

13th Match: England v Netherlands at East London – Feb
16, 2003
Netherlands 142/9 (50 ov); England 144/4 (23.2 ov)
England won by 6 wickets (with 160 balls remaining)

14th Match: Namibia v Pakistan at Kimberley – Feb 16,
2003
Pakistan 255/9 (50 ov); Namibia 84 (17.4 ov)
Pakistan won by 171 runs

15th Match: South Africa v New Zealand at Johannesburg
– Feb 16, 2003
South Africa 306/6 (50 ov); New Zealand 229/1 (36.5/39
ov)
New Zealand won by 9 wickets (with 13 balls remaining)
(D/L method)

16th Match: Bangladesh v West Indies at Benoni – Feb
18, 2003
West Indies 244/9 (50 ov); Bangladesh 32/2 (8.1 ov)
No result

17th Match: Zimbabwe v India at Harare – Feb 19, 2003
India 255/7 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 172 (44.4 ov)
India won by 83 runs

18th Match: Canada v Sri Lanka at Paarl – Feb 19, 2003
Canada 36 (18.4 ov); Sri Lanka 37/1 (4.4 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 9 wickets (with 272 balls remaining)

19th Match: England v Namibia at Port Elizabeth – Feb
19, 2003
England 272 (50 ov); Namibia 217/9 (50 ov)
England won by 55 runs

20th Match: Australia v Netherlands at Potchefstroom –
Feb 20, 2003
Australia 170/2 (36/36 ov); Netherlands 122 (30.2/36 ov)
Australia won by 75 runs (D/L method)

21st Match: Kenya v New Zealand at Nairobi (Gym) – Feb
21, 2003
Kenya won (walkover without a ball bowled)

22nd Match: South Africa v Bangladesh at Bloemfontein –
Feb 22, 2003
Bangladesh 108 (35.1 ov); South Africa 109/0 (12 ov)
South Africa won by 10 wickets (with 228 balls
remaining)

23rd Match: England v Pakistan at Cape Town – Feb 22,
2003
England 246/8 (50 ov); Pakistan 134 (31 ov)
England won by 112 runs

24th Match: Canada v West Indies at Centurion – Feb 23,
2003
Canada 202 (42.5 ov); West Indies 206/3 (20.3 ov)
West Indies won by 7 wickets (with 177 balls remaining)

25th Match: India v Namibia at Pietermaritzburg – Feb
23, 2003
India 311/2 (50 ov); Namibia 130 (42.3 ov)
India won by 181 runs

26th Match: Kenya v Sri Lanka at Nairobi (Gym) – Feb
24, 2003
Kenya 210/9 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 157 (45 ov)
Kenya won by 53 runs

27th Match: Zimbabwe v Australia at Bulawayo – Feb 24,
2003
Zimbabwe 246/9 (50 ov); Australia 248/3 (47.3 ov)
Australia won by 7 wickets (with 15 balls remaining)

28th Match: Netherlands v Pakistan at Paarl – Feb 25,
2003
Pakistan 253/9 (50 ov); Netherlands 156 (39.3 ov)
Pakistan won by 97 runs

29th Match: Bangladesh v New Zealand at Kimberley – Feb
26, 2003
Bangladesh 198/7 (50 ov); New Zealand 199/3 (33.3 ov)
New Zealand won by 7 wickets (with 99 balls remaining)

30th Match: England v India at Durban – Feb 26, 2003
India 250/9 (50 ov); England 168 (45.3 ov)
India won by 82 runs

31st Match: Australia v Namibia at Potchefstroom – Feb
27, 2003
Australia 301/6 (50 ov); Namibia 45 (14 ov)
Australia won by 256 runs

32nd Match: South Africa v Canada at East London – Feb
27, 2003
South Africa 254/8 (50 ov); Canada 136/5 (50 ov)
South Africa won by 118 runs

33rd Match: Zimbabwe v Netherlands at Bulawayo – Feb
28, 2003
Zimbabwe 301/8 (50 ov); Netherlands 202/9 (50 ov)
Zimbabwe won by 99 runs

34th Match: Sri Lanka v West Indies at Cape Town – Feb
28, 2003
Sri Lanka 228/6 (50 ov); West Indies 222/9 (50 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 6 runs

35th Match: Bangladesh v Kenya at Johannesburg – Mar 1,
2003
Kenya 217/7 (50 ov); Bangladesh 185 (47.2 ov)
Kenya won by 32 runs

36th Match: India v Pakistan at Centurion – Mar 1, 2003
Pakistan 273/7 (50 ov); India 276/4 (45.4 ov)
India won by 6 wickets (with 26 balls remaining)

37th Match: Australia v England at Port Elizabeth – Mar
2, 2003
England 204/8 (50 ov); Australia 208/8 (49.4 ov)
Australia won by 2 wickets (with 2 balls remaining)

38th Match: Canada v New Zealand at Benoni – Mar 3,
2003
Canada 196 (47 ov); New Zealand 197/5 (23 ov)
New Zealand won by 5 wickets (with 162 balls remaining)

39th Match: Namibia v Netherlands at Bloemfontein – Mar
3, 2003
Netherlands 314/4 (50 ov); Namibia 250 (46.5 ov)
Netherlands won by 64 runs

40th Match: South Africa v Sri Lanka at Durban – Mar 3,
2003
Sri Lanka 268/9 (50 ov); South Africa 229/6 (45/45 ov)
Match tied (D/L method)

41st Match: Zimbabwe v Pakistan at Bulawayo – Mar 4,
2003
Pakistan 73/3 (14/38 ov)
No result

42nd Match: Kenya v West Indies at Kimberley – Mar 4,
2003
West Indies 246/7 (50 ov); Kenya 104 (35.5 ov)
West Indies won by 142 runs

1st Super: Australia v Sri Lanka at Centurion – Mar 7,
2003
Australia 319/5 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 223 (47.4 ov)
Australia won by 96 runs

2nd Super: India v Kenya at Cape Town – Mar 7, 2003
Kenya 225/6 (50 ov); India 226/4 (47.5 ov)
India won by 6 wickets (with 13 balls remaining)

3rd Super: New Zealand v Zimbabwe at Bloemfontein – Mar
8, 2003
Zimbabwe 252/7 (50 ov); New Zealand 253/4 (47.2 ov)
New Zealand won by 6 wickets (with 16 balls remaining)

4th Super: India v Sri Lanka at Johannesburg – Mar 10,
2003
India 292/6 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 109 (23 ov)
India won by 183 runs

5th Super: Australia v New Zealand at Port Elizabeth –
Mar 11, 2003
Australia 208/9 (50 ov); New Zealand 112 (30.1 ov)
Australia won by 96 runs

6th Super: Kenya v Zimbabwe at Bloemfontein – Mar 12,
2003
Zimbabwe 133 (44.1 ov); Kenya 135/3 (26 ov)
Kenya won by 7 wickets (with 144 balls remaining)

7th Super: India v New Zealand at Centurion – Mar 14,
2003
New Zealand 146 (45.1 ov); India 150/3 (40.4 ov)
India won by 7 wickets (with 56 balls remaining)

8th Super: Sri Lanka v Zimbabwe at East London – Mar
15, 2003
Sri Lanka 256/5 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 182 (41.5 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 74 runs

9th Super: Australia v Kenya at Durban – Mar 15, 2003
Kenya 174/8 (50 ov); Australia 178/5 (31.2 ov)
Australia won by 5 wickets (with 112 balls remaining)

1st SF: Australia v Sri Lanka at Port Elizabeth – Mar
18, 2003
Australia 212/7 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 123/7 (38.1/38.1 ov)
Australia won by 48 runs (D/L method)

2nd SF: India v Kenya at Durban – Mar 20, 2003
India 270/4 (50 ov); Kenya 179 (46.2 ov)
India won by 91 runs

Final: Australia v India at Johannesburg – Mar 23, 2003
Australia 359/2 (50 ov); India 234 (39.2 ov)
Australia won by 125 runs

 

2007 World Cup in the Caribbean – Australia beat
Sri Lanka


The
2007 World Cup in West Indies

Australia triumph in a tournament to forget

World Cup No. 9
Teams 16
Minnows Bermuda, Canada, Holland, Ireland, Kenya,
Scotland

Format
The lessons of 1999 and 2003 were learned and so the
Super Eights qualifying was from four groups of four.
However, the advertising men were left gawping as India
and Pakistan failed to make it through the first round,
Bangladesh and Ireland taking their places. While that
thrilled the neutrals, it caused a flurry of “never
again” chart from Asia and Dubai. The only points
carried forward were the ones against the other
qualifiers from the same group, which at least should
have given the second round some meaning.

Innovations
This was the first World Cup to use Powerplays, that
aside, it was pretty much as before.

Early Running
When West Indies beat Pakistan in the opening match, few
suspected what was to follow, both on and off the field,
and in terms of a series of dreadful matches. Pakistan
were eliminated in their second game after contriving to
lose by three wickets to Ireland, a result entirely
overshadowed by the death hours later of Bob Woolmer
their coach. The whole tournament was stunned and then
thrown into doubt when Jamaica’s police claimed he had
been murdered. It turned out he had not, but things
never recovered. India, meanwhile, were well beaten by
Bangladesh and then sent packing by Sri Lanka. New
Zealand and England went through from Group C – England
courtesy of wins over Canada and Kenya – while Australia
and South Africa barely broke sweat in a group
containing Scotland and Netherlands.

Super Eights
Bangladesh and Ireland’s qualification meant that, in
reality, the semi-finals were between four of six, and
with England and the hosts looking all at sea (literally
in Freddie Flintoff’s case), the excitement was minimal.
Of 24 games only three were remotely tense, the best the
first and last, England v South Africa and a meaningless
clash between England and West Indies with Brian Lara’s
bowing out.

The Semis
Sri Lanka beat New Zealand by 81 runs thanks to Mahela
Jayawardene’s 115 not out and New Zealand were always
well behind the clock. Australia thrashed South Africa
who once again chocked, crashing to 27 for 5 before
limping to 149 – Australia strolled home with 18 overs
to spare.

The Final
The best two sides made the final, but the farcical
scenes at the end of the match summed up the utter
shambles that almost everyone – other than the
relentlessly upbeat ICC – knew the tournament had
become. Adam Gilchrist thumped 149 off 104 balls – even
that was shrouded in controversy as he admitted to using
a squash ball inside his glove as an aid – as Australia
scored 281 for 4 in a rain-reduced 38 overs. Sri Lanka
chased gamely and while Kumar Sangakkara and Sanatah
Jayasuriya added 116 for the second wicket they were in
with a shout but they fell in quick succession and then
farce descended in the gloom. The umpires left the field
for bad light as Australia celebrated but then the
officials, amid scenes with left cricket a laughing
stock, brought the players back on. By the end, nobody
could see what was happening in the middle.

Last Hurrah
Some big games departed … Glenn McGrath went out on a
high with a third winners medal and the
man-of-the-Tournament award; Inzamam-ul-Haq went in
tears after his dismissal against Zimbabwe, the pressure
of the captaincy and Woolmer’s death all too much; Lara
might have felt like crying after being left high and
dry by Marlon Samuels in front of a full house in
Barbados. How many of an ageing Australia side will be
back in 2011 is open to doubt. As for the coaches, 14 of
the 16 who went into the tournament had moved on with
six months.

First Hurrah
There was a paucity of good young talent, the cupboard
was fairly bare. Shaun Tait of Australia impressed but
it was very much a tournament for the old guard.

Not to be forgotten
Sadly, this will be remember for all the wrong reasons.
It was overlong – a record 56 days – and the organisers
managed to stage an event in the Caribbean and then do
all they could to strip out every facet that makes
watching the game there such fun. Overzealous security
was again to the fore, ticket prices were silly –
Barbados finally broke ranks, slashed the cost and were
rewarded with full houses – complete idiocy meant that
at some venues people had to walk long distances to get
to games, and local business inflated their prices, and
in many cases got burned. The booing of local and ICC
dignitaries at the final presentations told its own
tale. But ultimately the ninth World Cup will be
remembered for the death of Woolmer and the media
hysteria which followed.

ICC World Cup, 2006/07 / Results

Winner – Australia
Matches

1st Match, Group D: West Indies v
Pakistan at Kingston – Mar 13, 2007
West Indies 241/9 (50 ov); Pakistan 187 (47.2 ov)
West Indies won by 54 runs

2nd Match, Group A: Australia v Scotland at Basseterre –
Mar 14, 2007
Australia 334/6 (50 ov); Scotland 131 (40.1 ov)
Australia won by 203 runs

3rd Match, Group C: Canada v Kenya at Gros Islet – Mar
14, 2007
Canada 199 (50 ov); Kenya 203/3 (43.2 ov)
Kenya won by 7 wickets (with 40 balls remaining)

4th Match, Group B: Bermuda v Sri Lanka at Port of Spain
– Mar 15, 2007
Sri Lanka 321/6 (50 ov); Bermuda 78 (24.4 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 243 runs

5th Match, Group D: Ireland v Zimbabwe at Kingston – Mar
15, 2007
Ireland 221/9 (50 ov); Zimbabwe 221 (50 ov)
Match tied

6th Match, Group C: England v New Zealand at Gros Islet
– Mar 16, 2007
England 209/7 (50 ov); New Zealand 210/4 (41 ov)
New Zealand won by 6 wickets (with 54 balls remaining)

7th Match, Group A: Netherlands v South Africa at
Basseterre – Mar 16, 2007
South Africa 353/3 (40/40 ov); Netherlands 132/9 (40/40
ov)
South Africa won by 221 runs

8th Match, Group B: Bangladesh v
India at Port of Spain – Mar 17, 2007
India 191 (49.3 ov); Bangladesh 192/5 (48.3 ov)
Bangladesh won by 5 wickets (with 9 balls remaining)

9th Match, Group D: Ireland v Pakistan at Kingston – Mar
17, 2007
Pakistan 132 (45.4 ov); Ireland 133/7 (41.4/47 ov)
Ireland won by 3 wickets (with 32 balls remaining) (D/L
method)

10th Match, Group A: Australia v Netherlands at
Basseterre – Mar 18, 2007
Australia 358/5 (50 ov); Netherlands 129 (26.5 ov)
Australia won by 229 runs

11th Match, Group C: Canada v England at Gros Islet –
Mar 18, 2007
England 279/6 (50 ov); Canada 228/7 (50 ov)
England won by 51 runs

12th Match, Group B: Bermuda v India at Port of Spain –
Mar 19, 2007
India 413/5 (50 ov); Bermuda 156 (43.1 ov)
India won by 257 runs

13th Match, Group D: West Indies v Zimbabwe at Kingston
– Mar 19, 2007
Zimbabwe 202/5 (50 ov); West Indies 204/4 (47.5 ov)
West Indies won by 6 wickets (with 13 balls remaining)

14th Match, Group C: Kenya v New Zealand at Gros Islet –
Mar 20, 2007
New Zealand 331/7 (50 ov); Kenya 183 (49.2 ov)
New Zealand won by 148 runs

15th Match, Group A: Scotland v South Africa at
Basseterre – Mar 20, 2007
Scotland 186/8 (50 ov); South Africa 188/3 (23.2 ov)
South Africa won by 7 wickets (with 160 balls remaining)

16th Match, Group B: Bangladesh v Sri Lanka at Port of
Spain – Mar 21, 2007
Sri Lanka 318/4 (50 ov); Bangladesh 112 (37/46 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 198 runs (D/L method)

17th Match, Group D: Pakistan v Zimbabwe at Kingston –
Mar 21, 2007
Pakistan 349 (49.5 ov); Zimbabwe 99 (19.1/20 ov)
Pakistan won by 93 runs (D/L method)

18th Match, Group C: Canada v New Zealand at Gros Islet
– Mar 22, 2007
New Zealand 363/5 (50 ov); Canada 249 (49.2 ov)
New Zealand won by 114 runs

19th Match, Group A: Netherlands v Scotland at
Basseterre – Mar 22, 2007
Scotland 136 (34.1 ov); Netherlands 140/2 (23.5 ov)
Netherlands won by 8 wickets (with 157 balls remaining)

20th Match, Group B: India v Sri Lanka at Port of Spain
– Mar 23, 2007
Sri Lanka 254/6 (50 ov); India 185 (43.3 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 69 runs

21st Match, Group D: West Indies v Ireland at Kingston –
Mar 23, 2007
Ireland 183/8 (48/48 ov); West Indies 190/2 (38.1/48 ov)
West Indies won by 8 wickets (with 59 balls remaining)
(D/L method)

22nd Match, Group A: Australia v South Africa at
Basseterre – Mar 24, 2007
Australia 377/6 (50 ov); South Africa 294 (48 ov)
Australia won by 83 runs

23rd Match, Group C: England v Kenya at Gros Islet – Mar
24, 2007
Kenya 177 (43/43 ov); England 178/3 (33/43 ov)
England won by 7 wickets (with 60 balls remaining)

24th Match, Group B: Bangladesh v Bermuda at Port of
Spain – Mar 25, 2007
Bermuda 94/9 (21/21 ov); Bangladesh 96/3 (17.3/21 ov)
Bangladesh won by 7 wickets (with 21 balls remaining)
(D/L method)

25th Match, Super Eights: West Indies v Australia at
North Sound – Mar 27-28, 2007
Australia 322/6 (50 ov); West Indies 219 (45.3 ov)
Australia won by 103 runs

26th Match, Super Eights: South Africa v Sri Lanka at
Providence – Mar 28, 2007
Sri Lanka 209 (49.3 ov); South Africa 212/9 (48.2 ov)
South Africa won by 1 wicket (with 10 balls remaining)

27th Match, Super Eights: West Indies v New Zealand at
North Sound – Mar 29, 2007
West Indies 177 (44.4 ov); New Zealand 179/3 (39.2 ov)
New Zealand won by 7 wickets (with 64 balls remaining)

28th Match, Super Eights: England v Ireland at
Providence – Mar 30, 2007
England 266/7 (50 ov); Ireland 218 (48.1 ov)
England won by 48 runs

29th Match, Super Eights: Australia v Bangladesh at
North Sound – Mar 31, 2007
Bangladesh 104/6 (22/22 ov); Australia 106/0 (13.5/22 ov)
Australia won by 10 wickets (with 49 balls remaining)

30th Match, Super Eights: West Indies v Sri Lanka at
Providence – Apr 1, 2007
Sri Lanka 303/5 (50 ov); West Indies 190 (44.3 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 113 runs

31st Match, Super Eights: Bangladesh v New Zealand at
North Sound – Apr 2, 2007
Bangladesh 174 (48.3 ov); New Zealand 178/1 (29.2 ov)
New Zealand won by 9 wickets (with 124 balls remaining)

32nd Match, Super Eights: Ireland v South Africa at
Providence – Apr 3, 2007
Ireland 152/8 (35/35 ov); South Africa 165/3 (31.3/35 ov)
South Africa won by 7 wickets (with 21 balls remaining)
(D/L method)

33rd Match, Super Eights: England v Sri Lanka at North
Sound – Apr 4, 2007
Sri Lanka 235 (50 ov); England 233/8 (50 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 2 runs

34th Match, Super Eights: Bangladesh v South Africa at
Providence – Apr 7, 2007
Bangladesh 251/8 (50 ov); South Africa 184 (48.4 ov)
Bangladesh won by 67 runs

35th Match, Super Eights: Australia v England at North
Sound – Apr 8, 2007
England 247 (49.5 ov); Australia 248/3 (47.2 ov)
Australia won by 7 wickets (with 16 balls remaining)

36th Match, Super Eights: Ireland v New Zealand at
Providence – Apr 9, 2007
New Zealand 263/8 (50 ov); Ireland 134 (37.4 ov)
New Zealand won by 129 runs

37th Match, Super Eights: West Indies v South Africa at
St George’s – Apr 10, 2007
South Africa 356/4 (50 ov); West Indies 289/9 (50 ov)
South Africa won by 67 runs

38th Match, Super Eights: Bangladesh v England at
Bridgetown – Apr 11, 2007
Bangladesh 143 (37.2 ov); England 147/6 (44.5 ov)
England won by 4 wickets (with 31 balls remaining)

39th Match, Super Eights: New Zealand v Sri Lanka at St
George’s – Apr 12, 2007
New Zealand 219/7 (50 ov); Sri Lanka 222/4 (45.1 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 6 wickets (with 29 balls remaining)

40th Match, Super Eights: Australia v Ireland at
Bridgetown – Apr 13, 2007
Ireland 91 (30 ov); Australia 92/1 (12.2 ov)
Australia won by 9 wickets (with 226 balls remaining)

41st Match, Super Eights: New Zealand v South Africa at
St George’s – Apr 14, 2007
South Africa 193/7 (50 ov); New Zealand 196/5 (48.2 ov)
New Zealand won by 5 wickets (with 10 balls remaining)

42nd Match, Super Eights: Bangladesh v Ireland at
Bridgetown – Apr 15, 2007
Ireland 243/7 (50 ov); Bangladesh 169 (41.2 ov)
Ireland won by 74 runs

43rd Match, Super Eights: Australia v Sri Lanka at St
George’s – Apr 16, 2007
Sri Lanka 226 (49.4 ov); Australia 232/3 (42.4 ov)
Australia won by 7 wickets (with 44 balls remaining)

44th Match, Super Eights: England v South Africa at
Bridgetown – Apr 17, 2007
England 154 (48 ov); South Africa 157/1 (19.2 ov)
South Africa won by 9 wickets (with 184 balls remaining)

45th Match, Super Eights: Ireland v Sri Lanka at St
George’s – Apr 18, 2007
Ireland 77 (27.4 ov); Sri Lanka 81/2 (10 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 8 wickets (with 240 balls remaining)

46th Match, Super Eights: West Indies v Bangladesh at
Bridgetown – Apr 19, 2007
West Indies 230/5 (50 ov); Bangladesh 131 (43.5 ov)
West Indies won by 99 runs

47th Match, Super Eights: Australia v New Zealand at St
George’s – Apr 20, 2007
Australia 348/6 (50 ov); New Zealand 133 (25.5 ov)
Australia won by 215 runs

48th Match, Super Eights: West Indies v England at
Bridgetown – Apr 21, 2007
West Indies 300 (49.5 ov); England 301/9 (49.5 ov)
England won by 1 wicket (with 1 ball remaining)

1st Semi-Final: New Zealand v Sri Lanka at Kingston –
Apr 24, 2007
Sri Lanka 289/5 (50 ov); New Zealand 208 (41.4 ov)
Sri Lanka won by 81 runs

2nd Semi-Final: Australia v South Africa at Gros Islet –
Apr 25, 2007
South Africa 149 (43.5 ov); Australia 153/3 (31.3 ov)
Australia won by 7 wickets (with 111 balls remaining)

Final: Australia v Sri Lanka at Bridgetown – Apr 28,
2007
Australia 281/4 (38/38 ov); Sri Lanka 215/8 (36/36 ov)
Australia won by 53 runs (D/L method)

 

2011 World Cup in India – India Beat Sri Lanka

The
2011 ICC Cricket World Cup was the tenth Cricket World
Cup. It was played in India, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh.
It was Bangladesh’s first time co-hosting a World Cup.
The World Cup was also due to be co-hosted by Pakistan,
but in the wake of the 2009 attack on the Sri Lanka
national cricket team in Lahore, the International
Cricket Council (ICC) decided to remove Pakistan from
the hosting countries. The headquarters of the
organising committee were originally situated in
Lahore, but have now been shifted to Mumbai. Pakistan
was supposed to hold 14 matches, including one
semi-final. Eight of Pakistan’s matches (including the
semi-final) were awarded to India, four to Sri Lanka
and two to Bangladesh.

All matches in the World Cup were
accorded One Day International status, with all matches
being played over 50 overs. Fourteen national cricket
teams competed in the tournament, including ten full
members and four associate members. The World Cup took
place between 19 February and 2 April 2011, with the
first match played on 19 February 2011 with co-hosts
India and Bangladesh facing off at the Sher-e-Bangla
National Stadium in Mirpur, Dhaka. The opening ceremony
was held on 17 February 2011 at Bangabandhu National
Stadium, Dhaka, two days before the start of the
tournament, with the final on 2 April 2011 between
India and Sri Lanka at Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai.

India won the tournament defeating
Sri Lanka by 6 wickets in the final in Mumbai and also
became the first nation to win the Cricket World Cup
final on home soil. India’s Yuvraj Singh was declared
the man of the tournament

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